How to check lun id in hyper v

One of the various concerns of a Hyper-V administrator is troubleshooting the Hyper-V environment when problems arise. Common troubleshooting for Hyper-V environments may involve investigating issues around attached storage, networking issues, or perhaps performance issues that may exist in the environment.

Whatever the issue may be, Hyper-V administrators must utilize troubleshooting tools available to be able to identify the issue or at least start looking in the right direction for the cause of the issue. One of the powerful troubleshooting tools at the disposal of the Hyper-V administrator is the Hyper-V event log.

The event logs in Windows Server has typically not received the most welcomed reaction from administrators. Typically, most administrators do not like scouring through log entries trying to find the source of the issue. However, with Windows Server hosting Hyper-V, Microsoft has done a much better job of specifically capturing Hyper-V events and organizing the Hyper-V specific logs in such a way that they make sense and are much more intuitive.

There are 11 different log files that are used to capture Hyper-V information in typical event viewer fashion, albeit in a much more useful manner. Windows Server contains the following log file groupings to help with troubleshooting Hyper-V environments:. Hyper-V specific event viewer logs useful in troubleshooting.

Even though Microsoft has organized the event viewer groups into fairly logical and intuitive channels, some may desire to take the event viewer a step further in the direction of consolidating all the logs into a single view for more easily piecing together issues or troubleshooting an underlying problem.

Switching between the different logs may be a bit cumbersome, especially if more than one Hyper-V component is at play in the issue or various parts of the overall problem picture are found in different logs.

There is a GitHub PowerShell module that can be downloaded that allows enabling all the important Windows event channels into a single evtx file to help with troubleshooting. There are a couple of steps to take advantage of the PowerShell module from GitHub. First, you need to download and import the PowerShell module, then you reproduce the issue which should capture the relevant information in the logs. Disable the analytical and operational logs — by default admin logs are left enabled.

When using System Center Virtual Machine Manager with the central point of management for Hyper-V, administrators have the ability to have a single pane of glass look at multiple Hyper-V hosts. Taking it a step further, the Details tab of the Jobs view provides a step-by-step overview of the action and any sub-component part of a task that failed.

Below, a failure to create virtual machine task shows the status of Failed. What caused the job to fail? The Details view allows digging further. Looking at Recent Jobs tasks. This is extremely helpful when you are looking to detail exactly what is causing a global task to fail.

Troubleshooting Windows Server Hyper-V environments can be intimidating at first glance with the various tools, management interfaces, and complex implementations that may be provisioned in certain environments. The Event Viewer on a Hyper-V host contains valuable information regarding the various major components that make up the Hyper-V infrastructure. These are separated out into a folder in the Windows Event Viewer Applications and Services node under the Windows parent group.

With each of the major Hyper-V components being logged, administrators can pinpoint the nature of a specific Hyper-V error. However, if administrators want a consolidated view, this can be accomplished with the GitHub PowerShell function that is readily available for download.

For a default consolidated and intuitive view of Hyper-V errors, System Center Virtual Machine Manager provides a centralized view of all Hyper-V hosts and clusters and allows a granular look at specific task failures and can even show the step on which a specific task failed. SCVMM is certainly recommended in larger Hyper-V deployments with several hosts and multiple clusters as it can consolidate and streamline troubleshooting time and effort due to the centralized management plan.

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how to check lun id in hyper v

How can the Hyper-V event log be used in troubleshooting a Hyper-V environment? What information is contained in the event logs for Hyper-V? Troubleshooting Hyper-V with Event Logs The event logs in Windows Server has typically not received the most welcomed reaction from administrators.The LUN has long been a bedrock of storage configuration for physical servers with LUN storage partitions carved out from RAID groups to provide logical chunks of capacity for applications.

Now, virtual server environments can abstract the physical characteristics of a server into software and so provide increased scale and utilisation of hardware resources. But, storage must still be provided to virtual server and virtual desktop machines, with the hypervisor taking on an important role as the virtualisation layer, abstracting physical storage resources to virtual devices.

So, what has happened to the LUN? Regardless of hypervisor type, the persistent retention of data needs some form of storage device, either a traditional hard drive or a solid-state disk SSD.

This is a proprietary file format used for storing virtual machine files that takes advantage of on-disk structures to support highly granular levels of object and block locking. The reason this is necessary is that most vSphere deployments use a small number of very large LUNs, with each LUN holding many virtual machines. For example, for thin provisioned VMDKs, where storage is allocated on demand, a guest hard drive will consist of a master VMDK file and many VMDK data files, representing the allocation units of each increment of space as the virtual machine writes more data to disk.

By contrast, Microsoft has chosen to incorporate all components of the virtual machine disk into a single file known as a VHD virtual hard disk. VHD files allocated as thin volumes known as dynamic hard disks expand by increasing the size of the file and consuming more space on disk.

It also makes it easy to clone a virtual machine, simply by taking a copy of the VHD and using it as the source of a new virtual machine. This is particularly beneficial using the new deduplication features of Windows which can significantly reduce the amount of space consumed by virtual machines that have been cloned from a master VHD.

Ultimately, provisioning storage for virtual environments is all about getting the right IOPS density for the capacity of storage being deployed. This may seem difficult to estimate but can be taken from existing physical servers as part of a migration programme, or by pre-building some virtual servers and measuring IOPS demand. This would require additional capacity to be built in for boot storm events. However, there are still some important design considerations even where a dedicated storage network is available.

This may not seem like the most logical approach, but bear in mind LUNs presented to vSphere and Hyper-V are typically large, and so queue depth to individual LUNs can become an issue, especially with workloads of different priorities. This can be especially important where high performance all-flash devices have been deployed. Typically, storage for these environments is presented using large LUNs up to 2TB to maximise the presentable capacity.

As a result, the users of that LUN, which could represent many hosts, all receive the same level of performance.

How to find the serial number of a LUN in Windows

The grouping of storage for hypervisor guests at the LUN level represents a physical restriction on delivering quality of service to an individual virtual machine; all guests on a LUN receive the same level of performance.

Microsoft recommends using a single LUN per VM, which may be restrictive in larger systems and certainly represents a significant management overheadbut is still possible to achieve.

VMware has stated its intention is to implement vVOLs — virtual volumes — to abstract the physical characteristics of the virtual machine storage from the storage array to the hypervisor. Please check the box if you want to proceed. Other than that, a very informative post. Thank you. Fidelma Russo, CTO at Iron Mountain, addresses data needs associated with digital transformation and how using that data will The COVID pandemic is adversely affecting businesses worldwide, but data science can help you solve immediate problems and Today's businesses must embrace digital technologies to survive.

Use this checklist to assess your organization's readiness for New research by Cisco Talos shows popular fingerprint scanning technology can be defeated by lifting actual fingerprints and Gender disparities imperil the threat intelligence community.

AI is making many essential cybersecurity tasks more effective and efficient. AI-enabled penetration testing, or BAS, Network management encompasses a range of tasks and processes. Explore 10 crucial tasks and accompanying best practices to ensure SASE architecture offers a compelling value proposition, as it converges networking and security services onto a single cloud Server hardware has consistently evolved since the s.I have a volume called "windowsservers" already.

LUN storage management for vSphere and Hyper-V

There is one VM running on that volume. I am trying to create a pass through disk but I cannot find the lun for this volume.

how to check lun id in hyper v

I do not see it in disk management. What is the easiest way to find this? I had to look this up because I am pretty sure I've used this elsewhere, here is what wikipedia says. You would think this would be a simple step. Hopefully I'm just blind this morning LOL. I think within Windows you can use diskpart to select your disk and then issue a "detail disk" command. Or are you looking for something else? I think you can use the list disk, list volume, and list partition commands to see the drive letters, size, and partitions for each disk.

Hopefully that would help you narrow it down. Wish I could be of a little more help. I don't know much about Hyper-V environments so I'm not very familiar with their configuration and layout. You may be way past this part but just thought I would throw it out there. I found the issue. It was because the VM was hosted on my other node, therefore the disk didn't match. You have to make sure you check the properties of the disk in the ssci initiator on the hosted node.

To continue this discussion, please ask a new question. Get answers from your peers along with millions of IT pros who visit Spiceworks. Popular Topics in Virtualization. Which of the following retains the information it's storing when the system power is turned off?

Ghost Chili. Jstear Feb 28, at UTC. Pure Capsaicin.I have a volume called "windowsservers" already. There is one VM running on that volume. I am trying to create a pass through disk but I cannot find the lun for this volume. I do not see it in disk management. What is the easiest way to find this? I had to look this up because I am pretty sure I've used this elsewhere, here is what wikipedia says. You would think this would be a simple step.

Hopefully I'm just blind this morning LOL. I think within Windows you can use diskpart to select your disk and then issue a "detail disk" command. Or are you looking for something else?

I think you can use the list disk, list volume, and list partition commands to see the drive letters, size, and partitions for each disk. Hopefully that would help you narrow it down. Wish I could be of a little more help. I don't know much about Hyper-V environments so I'm not very familiar with their configuration and layout. You may be way past this part but just thought I would throw it out there. I found the issue.

It was because the VM was hosted on my other node, therefore the disk didn't match. You have to make sure you check the properties of the disk in the ssci initiator on the hosted node.

70-410 Objective 3.2 - Creating and Configuring VM Storage on Hyper-V 2012 R2 Part 1

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Virtual Machine settings in Hyper-V Manager explained

Track users' IT needs, easily, and with only the features you need. Ghost Chili. Jstear Feb 28, at UTC.In one of my previous articlesI went over all the ins and outs of managing networking on Hyper-V servers. One absolutely critical resource is disk storage and understanding how to manage disk storage in Hyper-V is important to overall project success. Hyper-V supports a lot of different kinds of storage including both directly attached storage and storage area networks.

For each of these overarching storage paradigms, the following technologies are supported:. Figure 1: Go to Hyper-V Settings. The first option on the Hyper-V Settings page provides you with a place to change the location of your virtual hard disks. Figure 2: Default VHD file location. A fixed VHD volume is created up front and has all of its space allocated at the time the volume is created.

So, if you create a new disk volume and give it a size of GB, that new volume will immediately consume GB of disk space on the host. There used to be a day when fixed virtual disk files were much better performers than their dynamic counterparts.

Those days are largely gone. Although users might enjoy a slight performance benefit from using fixed virtual disks over dynamic ones, the difference is not huge.

Like a fixed disk, you specify the size of a dynamic disk at the time its created but the amount of space on the host actually used by the disk depends on how much data is being stored on that particular volume. This concept is also known as thin provisioning.

how to check lun id in hyper v

For example, if you create a GB dynamic disk but the virtual machine is using only 20 GB of space on that disk, which will also be the amount of disk space consumed by the volume. Whenever reasonable, I highly recommend that you use dynamic disks as your storage medium of choice. At Westminster College, although we used VMware, this thin provisioning concept follows and we use it for every single virtual machine we run as a way to reduce overall storage costs. We do carefully watch storage and migrate virtual machines to new stores as necessary, but it has helped us reduce the overall amount of storage we need for our virtual environment.

Or, the service simply needs so much disk space that presenting a physical volume makes more sense. For example, while I was creating my Data Protection Manager course for Train Signal, I needed to use a storage volume that was huge in size and based on physical — not virtual — disks.

A pass-through disk allows you to mount a physical volume to a Hyper-V virtual machine. In my DPM course, I used a pass-through disk to act as the storage pool device that I needed to use for my lab scenarios. There are, however, some serious drawbacks to the use of pass-through disks. A differencing disk is a dynamically expanding disk that is chained to a parent disk.

With a differencing disk, the parent disk never changes; all changed blocks are reflected in the differencing disk. With this method, you can create a bunch of identical virtual machines and each can have its own differencing disk for customizations, but the parent disk is never changed.

Microsoft recommends that you always use fixed size virtual disks in a production environment in order to eliminate the possibility of running out of storage space as disks expand. While I see the point of their guidance, I disagree with it if you have the ability to carefully monitor your storage usage. If you do, dynamically expanding virtual disks provide you with a lower overall cost of ownership as well as additional flexibility with regard to shared disk storage.

Although VHD files do provide some significant flexibility, such as enabling the ability to create snapshots and move virtual machines from host to host, they do carry some limitations:. Information Technology environments are hardly static entities; indeed, they change often and they change significantly. The disks associated with your individual Hyper-V-based virtual machines are no exception. As time goes on, you may find it necessary to modify the properties for one of these disks.

You can see this option highlighted in the figure below. Figure 3: Select Edit Disk to get started.The LUN has long been a bedrock of storage configuration for physical servers with LUN storage partitions carved out from RAID groups to provide logical chunks of capacity for applications. Now, virtual server environments can abstract the physical characteristics of a server into software and so provide increased scale and utilisation of hardware resources.

But, storage must still be provided to virtual server and virtual desktop machines, with the hypervisor taking on an important role as the virtualisation layer, abstracting physical storage resources to virtual devices. So, what has happened to the LUN? Regardless of hypervisor type, the persistent retention of data needs some form of storage device, either a traditional hard drive or a solid-state disk SSD.

This is a proprietary file format used for storing virtual machine files that takes advantage of on-disk structures to support highly granular levels of object and block locking. The reason this is necessary is that most vSphere deployments use a small number of very large LUNs, with each LUN holding many virtual machines.

For example, for thin provisioned VMDKs, where storage is allocated on demand, a guest hard drive will consist of a master VMDK file and many VMDK data files, representing the allocation units of each increment of space as the virtual machine writes more data to disk. By contrast, Microsoft has chosen to incorporate all components of the virtual machine disk into a single file known as a VHD virtual hard disk.

VHD files allocated as thin volumes known as dynamic hard disks expand by increasing the size of the file and consuming more space on disk. It also makes it easy to clone a virtual machine, simply by taking a copy of the VHD and using it as the source of a new virtual machine. This is particularly beneficial using the new deduplication features of Windows which can significantly reduce the amount of space consumed by virtual machines that have been cloned from a master VHD.

Ultimately, provisioning storage for virtual environments is all about getting the right IOPS density for the capacity of storage being deployed. This may seem difficult to estimate but can be taken from existing physical servers as part of a migration programme, or by pre-building some virtual servers and measuring IOPS demand. This would require additional capacity to be built in for boot storm events.

However, there are still some important design considerations even where a dedicated storage network is available. This may not seem like the most logical approach, but bear in mind LUNs presented to vSphere and Hyper-V are typically large, and so queue depth to individual LUNs can become an issue, especially with workloads of different priorities.

This can be especially important where high performance all-flash devices have been deployed. Typically, storage for these environments is presented using large LUNs up to 2TB to maximise the presentable capacity. As a result, the users of that LUN, which could represent many hosts, all receive the same level of performance. The grouping of storage for hypervisor guests at the LUN level represents a physical restriction on delivering quality of service to an individual virtual machine; all guests on a LUN receive the same level of performance.

Microsoft recommends using a single LUN per VM, which may be restrictive in larger systems and certainly represents a significant management overheadbut is still possible to achieve. VMware has stated its intention is to implement vVOLs — virtual volumes — to abstract the physical characteristics of the virtual machine storage from the storage array to the hypervisor.

Please check the box if you want to proceed. Other than that, a very informative post. Thank you. Mike Kelly dives into his role as CIO and the data literacy program he co-founded at Red Hat, as well as provides insight for Fidelma Russo, CTO at Iron Mountain, addresses data needs associated with digital transformation and how using that data will Even during pandemics, hackers use malware such as ransomware and phishing to exploit an organization's vulnerabilities.

Configuration management is essential to keep accurate network configuration records and to help organizations avoid potential Secure Access Service Edge is the new approach to improving network performance in enterprises powered by cloud and mobile.The event logs in Windows Server are one of the first places you should look when something goes wrong.

Navigating them can be challenging, however, for several reasons. Second, the names given to event channels by Microsoft are often cryptic and unusual. This article examines some of the event channels you might want to use when you need to troubleshoot Hyper-V hosts and the virtual machines running on these hosts. When an event of some sort occurs on a Windows Server system such as a Hyper-V host — for example when a virtual machine shuts down on the host — the event is written to the appropriate event log channel.

Basically, you can picture an event log channel as a kind of sink that traps certain kinds of events happening on the system. The trapped events can then be read using an event log collector tool such as the built-in Event Viewer tool. Hyper-V, of course, is the hypervisor technology that provides virtualization capabilities in the Windows Server platform. And as new capabilities have been added to Hyper-V in Windows ServerWindows Server R2, and Windows Server there have been corresponding changes in which event log channels are defined on these platforms.

For example, the Hyper-V High-Availability event channel requires that the Failover Clustering feature is installed on the host. Note also that certain kinds of event logs are only present in a channel if they have been turned on. Analytic and Debug are two types of logs of this nature. For a brief but helpful explanation of what kinds of events some of these different event channels log you can see this post by Lars Iwer on the Microsoft Virtualization Blog.

Note also that some of these types of channel are only collected after the administrator has turned on logging for that particular type of channel. For example, when a live migration is initiated an event information has been abbreviated similar to the following will be logged in the Hyper-V-VMMS-Admin log:. If the live migration fails, then an error event like the following one is likely to be found in the System event log on the host:. Virtual Machine ID. Failed to receive data for a Virtual Machine migration: An existing connection was forcibly closed by the remote host.

COM Description: Failed to receive data for a Virtual Machine migration: An existing connection was forcibly closed by the remote host. Virtual machine ID. At this point we need to start troubleshooting network connectivity between the two Hyper-V hosts involved in the live migration to try and see what might be wrong. To do this one could start with the usual tools like ping, but it could also be a hardware problem involving a NIC in one of the hosts or it might be a misconfiguration of some advanced networking setting on one of the NICs.

An administrator was seeing the following error event information has been abbreviated being logged repeatedly every 10 minutes on his clustered Hyper-V hosts:. Instead, it turned out that the problem was associated with the Hyper-V Replica Broker. It turned out that the administrator had renamed all of the CSV volumes on the cluster to adhere to their standing nomenclature, but the configuration for the Broker still pointed to an old volume.

This illustrates the importance of understanding how recent changes you might have made to the configuration of your Hyper-V hosts might lead to unexpected errors happening if you modified a setting incorrectly or forgot to make a required change to some setting. Having a good grasp of the Hyper-V architecture and how its various components interact and work together can also be helpful when troubleshooting problems with Hyper-V hosts.


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